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07

Feb
2018

SOYA is bad for you

Now – before I begin – all of you who argue for and against the health benefits of the widely-cultivated legume in terms of health may be confused with the real S.O.Y.A and its detriment to health.

Sitting On Your Arse (SOYA) has many drawbacks both in terms of physical and mental health and for a majority of us, being sedentary for long periods of time has become the norm.  The pressure of completing projects in the workplace meaning longer days sat at computers and the undeniable influence of social media leading to the ‘sit and scroll’ age has led to many becoming more and more sedentary, which – as you know – leads to less energy consumption and overall body fat gain.  Becoming less active has become a subconscious act and one that almost always requires a large conscious component to remedy. Below we outline 5 ways to start being more active.

1. TRACK & ASSESS FOR HEALTH

There has been a steep rise in technology that tracks almost all lifestyle metrics from the food you eat to the steps you make.  Activity trackers have never been more popular than they are now.  I believe this is due to the sedentary nature of our lifestyle at present.  In the short term, using an activity tracker can be an extremely valuable tool in the awareness of movement and the accountability to move more.

You can pick up a good quality activity tracker for around £30-£40 which is good value if you see the positive implementation of increased movement and the health benefits associated with it.

TRY THIS: Track your movement for 7 days, calculate your average steps, then look to improve on that average the following week.

2. USE MOVEMENT TO EXPEND ENERGY

There are many forms of energy expenditure and while some are more effective than others, moving is better than none at all.  Understand that the cumulative effect of expending energy is vitally important for health.  Training for 60 minutes 6 times a week and doing 2,000 steps per day would lead to less cumulative energy expenditure than someone training 4 times per week and doing 10,000 steps per day.  Training, hobbies and other activities are fantastic energy consumers.  By adding extra movement daily will improve all health markers and overall body composition.

3. MOVE TO RELAX

Training, walking and general movement should be – and can be – used for relaxation.  The infinite fluidity of our lifestyles means that stress usually comes in high on peoples’ hierarchy.  Stealing any opportunity to relax through activity over S.O.Y.A should be applauded and undertaken. Walking outside will allow you to clear your head and reset during busy and stressful periods.

4. MOVE TO LEARN

Taking time out to move can give you an opportunity to learn.  Listening to podcasts or audio books are a fantastic way to combine the relaxation benefits of moving while improving your knowledge on subjects that connect you to personal and professional development or just a good old fiction novel. One of our favourite podcasts comes from Tim Ferris.  Check it out here.

5. MOVE TO SOCIALISE

Take time away from social media and move with friends, family, partners and/or work colleagues.  Taking the time to be active in groups promotes opportunities to develop closer personal relationships while reaping the benefits of the movement itself.

CONCLUSION

You see, Sitting on your arse has no real positive benefit.  Get up, get out and get moving.  The potential upside of moving regularly is limitless and has very little to no downside.  Who doesn’t want to look better, feel better, improve productivity and inter personal skills?  Being more active can – and does- give you all of this, and more.

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